Vertical Zoetrope

Optical devise precursor of the cinema, based on the phenakistoscope, it was invented in 1834 by the English mathematician William Horner.
Are all four feet of a galloping horse off the ground at the same time?

The human eye cannot see it, but for an instant a galloping horse keeps all four legs suspended in the air. In 1872 the British photographer and researcher Eadweard Muybridge was commissioned to make a sequence of shots of a galloping horse to prove it. For this, he invented a mechanical shutter to capture the instant (snap shot), as the manual shutter used at the time was too slow to obtain a clear image. In this way it was possible to confirm that, in effect, a horse “flies”. The experiment was repeated in 1878 with a series of technical innovations that improved the results. The images obtained were published in the Scientific American journal, and are used in the zoetrope you can see. The motion picture is just one step away!

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Eadweard Muybridge set up this installation in 1878 to photograph a galloping horse. As it passed over them, it broke the tapes connected to a series of cameras, activating their shutters.