Holbein Anamorphosis

Our anamorphosis is based on paintings by Hans Holbein the Younger (1497-1543), one of the first Renaissance artists to draw one. In his well-known picture
“The Ambassadors”, there is a deformed skull in the lower half. You can see it properly close up from the right hand side. Our tribute to this painter is a free interpretation where we have combined two of his portraits: “Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling” and “Simon George of Cornwall”.
An anamorphosis is a deformed image that appears in its true shape thanks to an optical effect – from certain viewpoints or reflected in a spoon or a curved mirror, which eliminate its distortion. We find the first known anamorphosis in a Leonardo da Vinci drawing.In the 20th century it became part of widescreen film technique – CinemaScope – thanks to astronomer and inventor Henri Chrétien. His Anamorphoscope (1926) captures and projects the images by means of anamorphosic lenses installed in the camera and the projector to lengthen the screen. There are computer programmes available now for creating anamorphosis.

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"The ambassadors" by Hans Holbein the younger 1533. On the right, the skull without any deformation.
“The ambassadors” by Hans Holbein the younger 1533. On the right, the skull without any deformation.
"Soldier on horseback" by Jean François Niceron.
“Soldier on horseback” by Jean François Niceron.