Horizontal Zoetrope

The purpose of this optical device was to create an illusion of movement. It was invented by the English mathematician William Horner in 1834, based on the phenakistoscope, but with the difference that the optical effect can be seen by several viewers at the same time. When looking through the slits in the drum, we see the static images in motion. Its inventor called it “daedaleum”, but it became popular by the name zoetrope, or “wheel of life”. In the second half of the 19th century it was the most famous “toy” based on the Persistence of vision principle. The paper strips with coloured illustrations could easily be fitted inside the drum, and versions for both children or adults became extremely popular in many parts of the world.

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Zootrope

Also called a “daedaleum”, this was a very popular toy in the second half of the 19th century.